What A Deep Dive Editing Session Looks Like

Since December 20005, I've created over 30 of my very own podcasts with over 3,600 podcast episodes. As you might imagine, I've become quite comfortable behind the microphone.

In fact, I've developed a method of creating content that I call “Live To Drive.” What this means is that I simply hit record on my recorder, I include everything I want to have in my episode, into the episode, as I am recording (including intro, outro or any other audio clips), and when I'm finished, I simply stop the recorder and I don't do any editing on the episode at all. In these “Live To Drive” episodes, my audience gets to hear everything that happened during to recording of the episode without a single edit.

Now with that said, there are still times when I record a podcast where, afterward, I think to myself… “hmmm, I might want to do a bit of editing on this.” There have been some episodes where I recorded for as much as an hour and fifteen minutes and, after editing, the final episode that was released was only 43 minutes in length, after I finished cutting out significant portions of audio during the editing process.

Recently, I recorded a lengthy audio segment that I knew I wanted to include in episode 497 of Podcast Answer Man / The Cliff Ravenscraft Show. After recording it, I knew that I wanted to do a “deep dive edit” on this recording before allowing it to be published to my audience.

I decided to fire up my Facebook Live Stream to share my editing process with my community. Those who were watching live and who have watched the replay on Facebook said that they found this over the shoulder look into my process very helpful.

For this reason, I've decided to the recordings from my Facebook Live Stream with you here. You'll notice that I broke the process into two separate Facebook Live Streams. The reason for this is that in the middle of editing, I needed to leave to go have dinner with my family. After I returned for dinner, I launched the second live stream and finished the editing of this audio segment.

I hope you enjoy.

Part 1:

Part 2:

22 Tips For Better Podcast Interviews


 
podintOne of the benefits of having a podcast is the ability to connect with people who you might not, otherwise, be able to connect with. By building a loyal audience around a particular niche focus, you have something of great value to offer to others. Exposure to your community.

Inviting leading industry experts, your favorite authors, etc. to be a guest on your podcast is a great way to build your personal and/or professional network. You also have the ability to gain a bit of credibility by association through the process.

However, if not done well, a podcast interview can harm a potential relationship and damage the credibility you have with your audience. Over the years, I have certainly made my fair share of mistakes when it comes to podcast interviews.

I devoted the second half of episode 315 of my podcast to providing a total of 22 tips to help improve your podcast interviews. I've taken the audio just from that portion of the episode, cleaned it up a bit with editing and embedded the audio file above.

I'm going to share the list of 22 tips below. However, if you listen to the audio, embedded above, you will hear me go into great detail about each of these tips. It's worth a listen if you have the time.

22 Tips To Improve Your Podcast Interviews

1. When inviting a guest for an interview, be sure to clearly communicate the name of your show, the website address of your show, and what your show is about.

2. Explain why you would like to have this guest on your show.

3. Clearly communicate how long you are requesting for the interview to take place.

4. Be prepared by offering at least two to three time slots for the guest to choose from. Be flexible if those are not a good fit for their schedule.

5. Once you confirm a date and time with your guest, be certain to communicate how the interview will be conducted. Provide applicable information such as phone number or Skype contact ID, etc, and clearly communicate who is going to initiate the call.

6. If the interview is scheduled more than a week in advance, be sure to send a follow up reminder one week prior to the scheduled interview.

7. Regardless of when the interview is scheduled, send a follow up reminder the day before the interview. Be sure to communicate, again, how the interview will be conducted, the contact information, and who will be initiating the call.

8. Be sure to include the time and TIME ZONE when sending requests and any confirmations or follow ups related to the interview.

9. Consider sending an outline of questions that you will cover in advance of the interview.

10. If something comes up on your schedule, that would conflict with your scheduled interview, do not put this off, immediately contact your guest and let them know. Make sure to confirm that they received your message about the conflict.

11. Always mark off at least 30 minutes before your scheduled interview to prepare for the call.

12. Call your guest ON TIME! Seriously, be very respectful of their time.

13. Do not go over your time scheduled for the interview.

14. Follow up with a thank you note. This can be done via email, but it has more impact when you send a card (or gift) by mail.

15. Be prepared to give an introduction of your guest rather than asking them to introduce themselves.

16. When asking a question, don’t continue speaking and answering the question for them.

17. Don’t interrupt your guest when they are speaking.

18. Don’t give verbal agreements to every statement that they make.

19. Avoid questions that allow for simple one word answers.

20. Have an idea of the main points you desire to have come out within the interview, ask questions that get you to reach those goals and allow the conversation to flow.

21. Listen to your guest while they are speaking.

22. Make sure to learn how to pronounce your guests name correctly.

I hope that these tips will help you make you a great first impression with those you interview on your podcast.

This post is a part of my weekly podcast development email newsletter. Every week, I share the best tips, advice, tools, techniques and strategies related to podcasting. Register today at http://podcastanswerman.com/newsletter.

Thank you for being a part of my community.

Until next time, I encourage you to take everything you do to the next level!

Sincerely,

Cliff

Coming Up With Content Ideas For Your Podcast

Since December 2005, I've produced a total of 30 podcasts with more than 3,600 of my very own podcast episodes. One question that I'm asked quite often is… “How do you consistently come up with new content for your podcast(s)?”

I covered this topic in the middle of one of my podcast episodes a few years back. Rather than point you back to that old episode and have you forward to the spot where I talked about this topic, I went ahead and created the following audio file which contains just that portion of the episode. Have a listen.
 

I mentioned the following two resources:
– Workflowy – http://Workflowy.com
– Feedly – http://Feedly.com

 
Below is a list of the sources I mentioned
– Questions and comments from your community.
– News feeds from your niche.
– What struggle are you currently facing? Ask your community for help.
– What obstacle have you recently overcome? Share how you did it.
– What are people talking about in social media?
– Be on the lookout for stories in your every day life.
– Share the success of someone else.
– Invite a guest to come on your show for a “conversation.”
– Search the archives of others in your niche “for inspiration only.”

12 Common Mistakes Made By Podcasters

I hosted a free webinar via a Facebook Live stream where I shared 12 common mistakes that podcasters make. Whether you're a seasoned podcaster or just getting ready to launch your first podcast, the following video replay will help you take your podcasting efforts to the next level.

Note: I did become aware that the video was mirrored about five minutes into presentation. After talking about artwork, I stopped referring to anything that might be odd to look at backwards.

Podcasting A to Z
Do you want to learn how to podcast but don't know where to start? Podcasting A to Z is a four week online training course that walks you through each step in the process of setting up a podcast. You not only get step-by-step tutorials, but you also have the ability to get answers to all your questions during the four week session.

If you have been thinking about starting a podcast, this is the course for you. Just head over to http://PodcastingAtoZ.com for full details. I look forward to potentially working with you.